The Lynn LaMontagne Schumann Preserve at Pilot Knob

223 acres in the Town of Fort Ann

After more than a decade of planning and negotiation, the Schumann Preserve at Pilot Knob was added to the list of protected lands within the Lake George basin in August 2000.  Originally, this parcel was illegally cleared, and a house and mile-long driveway were constructed.  The five-acre house lot became a focal point throughout the south basin and around the lake because it disrupted the unbroken wilderness of the Pilot Knob range.  Further proposed development would have greatly changed the quality and character of the entire basin.  Clearly visible from nearly any point in the southern half of Lake George, the house and its outlying buildings scarred the once-pristine ridgeline and galvanized support for conservation.  The property was subsequently confiscated by authorities and resold to the Zug family who stewarded the land for over ten years.

"After spending time on the mountain, it became clear that there was really no other choice but to do what was necessary to preserve this amazing place," say Steve Szymanski and Carli Zug, referring to their decision to sell this wonderful area to the LGLC. With the help of hundreds of donors, the LGLC was able to purchase the property at below market value.

This property, first named the Pilot Knob Ridge Preserve, was renamed on August 9, 2010 at a dedication ceremony in honor of LGLC's past executive director, Lynn LaMontagne Schumann, who was instrumental in its preservation. Lynn passed away from breast cancer in March, 2010. More can be read about Lynn and her time with LGLC here.

TRAILS
An updated trail map is in progress (the trail following the old driveway has been rerouted).  Since this is a heavily used property the trails are well worn and well marked but some turns can be missed if you're not paying attention.

The orange trail leads from the parking area for a steady ascent of 620 feet to the gazebo and scenic lookout, following a rocky path that can also be wet in the case of recent rain. In the winter, the trail can be icy; so you should use crampons or microspikes.  After 0.25 miles the trail splits and you can get to the gazebo by either continuing to climb east for another 0.5 miles or head south on a slightly longer path with a softer foot bed.

Just south of the gazebo the blue trail leads further east for a more gentle hike through hemlock and oak forests and grassy meadows. After about 0.9 miles you'll come to the head of the waterfall loop. Follow the trail south for 0.1 miles to the base of the waterfall or head northeast to climb to the top. The waterfall is seasonal and though active in the spring it is often dry in late summer and fall.

Lake George Land Conservancy • 4905 Lake Shore Drive P.O. Box 1250 Bolton Landing, NY 12814 • (518) 644-9673

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